Passwords on the iPod Touch

On my Palm I used Keyring to keep track of my passwords. This has a nice interface in jpilot to access it on my desktop. When it came to my iPod Touch I needed to find something else to use. I did some searching and found that there was an open source password program called KeePass that had applications for many platforms (including Windows, Linux, Mac and IOS). ¬†It turns out that there is an old version of the database (1.x) and a new version (2.x). There isn’t an application for the new format on Linux yet, so I choose to use the old database format and the desktop application KeePassX. There are two applications for IOS listed on the KeePass website: MyKeePass and iKeepass. I chose ¬†MyKeePass because it supports both the old and new formats and seems to have been updated more recently.

MyKeePass can store multiple databases and those databases can be loaded from a public website, or from it’s own web server. You can tell the application you want to import a database file and it starts up a mini web server that just has an upload page and tells you the URL to visit. If your computer is on the same network you can visit this URL and then upload the database and it’s on your device. This is pretty nice. It would even better if MyKeePass could read the database file from Dropbox, but that functionality doesn’t exist yet. You can have MyKeePass reference a public URL and that could be a public file in Dropbox, but that seems a little to open for me. I’d prefer it to be a private folder on Dropbox that I store my database in.

I found an XSLT to convert the output of the keyring XML exporter to the 2.x format of KeePass, but not to the 1.x format. So I hacked on the 2.x XSLT some and created my version for 1.x. This is a fork of the original that I hope will get pulled into the main.